London espresso: Kensington

Part of a series highlighting one area of London.

Kensington is part of the Royal Burough of Kensington & Chelsea. Despite being absurdly affluent, this district of West London actually offers a bit of something for everyone. If travelling in a group, I recommend starting at South Kensington Station (30 minutes from Liverpool Street by tube) and then everyone can fan out to their areas of interest accordingly.

Kensington is notably home to “Albertopolis,” an area centred on Exhibition Road and named after Prince Albert, husband of Queen Victoria.  Here you can find cultural sites including the Natural History Museum, the Royal College of Art, the Royal Geographical Society, the Science Museum, and the Victoria & Albert Museum.

Whilst you’re out and about in this area, in addition to the museums and shops, be sure to take note of the architecture. The average house price in Kensington & Chelsea is about 40 times greater than average annual earnings, at a cool £1.4m. How many Chelsea Tractors (Land Rovers) can you spot parked on the street?!

Day Planner
Distance: for a sense of scale, the walk from Diana Memorial Playground (top left corner of the map below) to Sloane Square (bottom right corner) is a little over two miles.
Stops: Sloane Square, Harrods, V&A, Natural History Museum, Science Museum, Albert Memorial, Kensington Palace.

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London espresso: Vibrant Central

Part of a series highlighting one area of London.

Central London. Get your walking shoes on and your wallets out, because this walking guide will have you traipsing around some of the busiest, most vibrant shopping areas of London. This was written with my Mother and Sister-in-law specifically in mind!

Day Planner
Distance: The route itself is 2 miles (3.2km) and would take about 40 minutes to walk. However, you will want to allow plenty of time for shopping!
Stops: Selfridges Department Store, Oxford Street, Liberty of London, Canaby Street, Regent Street, Picadilly Circus, Leicester Square (and an optional detour to M&Ms World), Trafalgar Square, and Charing Cross.

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  • Make your way to Selfridges, a luxury department store near Bond Street Station (easy to get to from Liverpool Street on the Central Line). This is second largest shop in the UK (after Harrods) and opened in 1909. Originally from America himself, Mr Selfridge attempted to dismantle the idea that consumerism was strictly an American phenomenon – he is said to have coined the phrase “the customer is always right.”
  • After Selfridges, walk east along Oxford Street which is Europe’s busiest shopping street. On average, half a million people visit Oxford Street every day, and foot traffic is in severe competition with buses and taxis – watch out! The first department stores in Britain opened on Oxford Street in the early 1900s, including Selfridges (above) and John Lewis. However, be alive to the fact that there are many “downmarket” stores trading alongside more prestigious stores. My advice is to avoid the trashy tourist shops.

 

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